Understanding the Nigerian Healthcare Delivery System: A Paradox of Preventive Medicine Since the Colonial Epoch

Main Article Content

Iroju Opeyemi Anthony

Abstract

No human society is mundane to healthcare delivery method. Apparently, the process of healthcare delivery depicts the extent of the social development of a particular society. However, the healthcare delivery process in Nigeria from the colonial era attained a new paradigm by shifting from the practice of traditional medicine to the western styled patterns. Since the colonial Nigeria, both the traditional and western medicine has been dependable sources of preventive medicine for the Nigeria populace. In spite of the outright condemnation of the traditional healthcare practices, it received unbridled patronage by a larger Nigeria populace, thus the post-independence Nigeria witnessed a paradox of health care delivery.

Aim: This paper aims to provide an understanding on the revolutions in the healthcare delivery system in Nigeria since the colonial period.

Methodology: An extensive review of literature was carried out to elicit information on the Nigerian healthcare delivery since the colonial period.

Results: The study revealed that the Nigerian healthcare delivery system is characterized by high cost. The study also showed that Nigeria has been witnessing inequitable distribution of healthcare facilities since the colonial period.

Conclusion: The healthcare delivery system in Nigeria is not a colonial invention but the advent of the colonial masters brought about an outstanding transformation in the healthcare delivery process of most Nigerian societies. Thus, the practice of preventive medicine is indigenous to the Nigerian people.

Keywords:
Healthcare, healthcare delivery, Nigeria, colonial, social development, traditional medicine.

Article Details

How to Cite
Anthony, I. O. (2019). Understanding the Nigerian Healthcare Delivery System: A Paradox of Preventive Medicine Since the Colonial Epoch. International Journal of TROPICAL DISEASE & Health, 34(3), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.9734/ijtdh/2018/v34i330094
Section
Opinion Article